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What We're Reading This Week

By Steve Majors Dec. 12, 2014

A Home for the Holidays is the focus of this week’s What We’re Reading

Not too long ago, Brisia Jahana Ibarra Gomez and her mom were living in their car with no place to call home. Communities In Schools of Renton connected Brisia’s family to the Salvation Army. Now backpacks of weekend food are helping Brisia and her family as they get back on their feet.   As CIS Executive Director Sue Paro tells the Columbian that CIS can’t always fix every problem a child faces in life but “what we can try is help their situation get to a better situation.”  

Alejandro Sánchez López wants to legally adopt his grandchildren, ages 2 to 13, to provide them the stability they need after their mother abandoned them, says the Austin Statesmen.  But he’s worried about keeping them fed, getting the children to and from school and daycare, and helping them with homework. Communities In Schools of Central Texas nominated the family for the Statesmen’s Season for Caring Program. Because of that nomination, local businesses have opened their hearts to help the family, ensuring that Alejandro can begin to build a safe home for his grandchildren.

And there are other ways, both big and small, that CIS is creating the feeling of home for kids in need.

  • By providing warm coats, Communities In Schools of Central Texas is “making the kids feel that somebody really cares about them.”
  • By giving clothes to students, Communities In Schools of Western Nevada is “helping kids get what they need to be successful coming to school.”
  • By donating Christmas trees, Communities In Schools of the Charleston Area is bringing holiday cheer into low-income homes.
  • And by organizing a donation drive, Communities in Schools of Nevada is making sure hundreds of low-income students across the state will walk home with gifts for the holidays this year.

Whether it’s a safe place to stay, a hot meal, warm clothes,  holiday gifts or just the presence of a caring adult, Communities In Schools is doing whatever it takes to make kids feel at home for the holidays.