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Portraits of Change: Aligning School and Community Resources to Reduce Chronic Absence

More than seven million students nationwide are chronically absent from school—missing so much school, for any reason, that they are academically at risk. Starting as early as preschool and kindergarten, chronic absence erodes students’ ability to learn and achieve in school. It increases the likelihood that children are unable to read well by third grade, fail classes in middle school and drop out of high school.

"Children living in poverty are two to three times more likely to be chronically absent—and face the most harm because they lack the resources to make up for the lost learning in school.  Students from communities of color (African American, Native American, Pacific Islander and Latino) as well as those with disabilities are disproportionately affected."

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